How to Build a Social Media Content Plan with Trello

Here’s a dead-simple way to build a social media content plan with Trello.

Without a Plan, Your Social Media Will Be A Mess

Managing your company’s social media presence can be a mess if you’re not intentional about it. It’s like that guy who’s sat on the couch all year and decides that on January 1, he’s going to go to the gym “like all the time.” Week one, he’s there every day. Week two… well, you know what happens. Without a solid plan that you can stick to, your social media content won’t be consistent or effective.

That’s why I’m going to show you how to build a social media content plan with Trello in 30 minutes or less.

For the sake of simplicity, this post will focus just on marketing content for Facebook. However, the methodology can be used for any content calendar, and even for multiple social networks if you’re creative. Here’s how it works:

Step 1: Ask What You Want To Accomplish

Why do you even have a social media presence in the first place? Do you want to keep customers talking about your brand? Announce new products? Set the tone for your brand’s voice? Make a list of key objectives. Keep it short, not more than three or four. Just like the guy planning to hit Gold’s Gym every day, not knowing why you’re doing something is a sure path to quitting. Here’s an example:

  • Keep customers informed of new product features
  • Foster engagement by highlighting outstanding customers
  • Reinforce our values through human-interest and humorous content
  • Improve company image vignettes of employees

2. Identify The Type Of Content That Will Best Serve Each Of Those Objectives

For example:

  • Keep customers informed… via events announcements and company news (Update)
  • Foster engagement… by highlighting outstanding customers (Community)
  • Reinforce our values… through human-interest and humorous content (Voice)
  • Improve company image… by featuring profiles of employees (Personality)

3. Prioritize Your Categories

Don’t just say, “they’re all important!”; prioritizing will help you decide how much content is devoted to each. Try this: give yourself 10 “points” to hand out. Give more points to the most important objectives, and fewer to secondary ones. So much math!!

  • Update: 3
  • Community: 3
  • Voice: 2
  • Image: 2

4. Calculate Your Output Capacity

How many posts per month can you consistently commit to? Don’t bite off more than you can chew and burn out after a month. At our company, we are planning to ramp up our volume to about 20 posts a month. That’s on the aggressive side, but we generate a lot of growth through Facebook and our followers have been very engaged with our content. Having videos with lots of gratuitous explosions always helps.

5. Do Some Math

With you ideal volume in hand, it’s time to match that against the priorities you outlined earlier. Apply the formula below to

Number of posts/month = (points assigned to category / total points) x total posts/month

For our first category, Updates, the formula would look like this:

(3 points / 10 total points) x 20 posts/month = 6 Update posts per month

Easy! You didn’t even need a calculator. Right? Right????…..  Don’t worry I won’t tell your 4th grade math teacher. Just repeat for the remaining categories and you’ll have a baseline plan for how many posts of each type to publish each month. Here’s what you’d end up with for all four categories:

  • Update – 6 posts/month
  • Community – 6 posts/month
  • Voice – 4 posts/month
  • Personality – 4 posts/month

6. Time To Build Your Social Media Content Plan With Trello

We use a 4-step workflow to manage content throughout the month. Every piece of content starts out in a Planned list, and moves through the following steps:

  1. Planned
  2. Being worked on
  3. Pending approval
  4. Scheduled

You may need fewer or more depending on the structure of your team. We have multiple content contributors, but only a couple people assigned to approve content, so this process helps us hand off content to the right people.

Now… create a Trello card in the Planned for each post you outlined above. The result will look something like this. Look at all those beautiful posts just waiting to be written. So many Likes and Shares lie ahead:

Building a social media content plan with Trello is easy.

7. Assign Owners

Whether you have one person or a team of ten managing content, make sure that every single card on your social media content plan with Trello has an owner. This is the person who will make sure that a piece of content is drafted, edited, and published on time, and by the right people. Give your team the gift of clear ownership and it will greatly streamline your process. Don’t assign owners and watch you best intentions disintegrate into pure and unrelenting madness. Your Facebook fans deserve better, don’t they?

8. Set Due Dates

Since you’re building your social media content plan with Trello, it’s time to figure out what to post when. Trello gives you a great calendar view, which makes it super-simple to get a bird’s eye view of the month. We use also labels to designate content categories, making it  easy to see what type of content will go out when. Here’s a possible result that will satisfy any obsessive compulsive disorder sufferer, with it’s neatly-spaced scheduling.

Your social media content plan with Trello never looked so neat.

9. Get Writing

Now that you’ve built your social media content plan with Trello, you have all your work cut out for you for the month. No more planning, go write!

At the end of the month, sit down with your content team and examine the results. Which types of social media content performed the best? Were there days of the week when you saw better results? Was your team able to handle the load?

You’ll want to make some tweaks to make next month even more effective. Now you’ve established a baseline, though, your process will be much more effective and well-informed.


This post was originally published on Flag and Frontier, my marketing consulting business for B2B technology companies.

How to Choose The Right CRM For Your Startup

Choosing a CRM is a lot like dating: you need some experience to know what you’re looking for, it takes a while to find out if you’ve made the right choice, and if you decide to switch to another option, it’s generally a pain. We recently went through the CRM selection process at my company, and we ended up with a great choice. I wanted to share the steps we went through, to hopefully save you some pain as your look for the right CRM for your startup. After all, the CRM you pick is something you’ll use everyday to execute your marketing strategy, so it’s worth investing time into making the right choice.

Background: Too Many Choices

We originally used Hubspot as an all-in-one marketing/sales platform. We tried to use it as a CRM as well, but it’s not well suited for that. As our sales volume started to increase, and we quickly needed a better solution to help us manage leads and deal discussions. After an afternoon spent Googling every CRM search string we could think of, we soon realized that there were hundreds of choices. Far too many, in fact. Suffocating under the sheer variety of options, we decided to take a step back…

Finding the Right CRM For Your Startup Begins With Assessing Your Needs

We took a break and tried to honestly assess what we really needed from a CRM. Just like your buddy’s girlfriend you can’t stand to be around, some CRMs will be a poor fit because they’re tailored for a different type of user. But since you can’t afford to date a dozen CRMs before you marry one, you have to figure out what you want first.

Here are a few questions that will help you find the right CRM for your startup:

  • How complex is your sales process? Perhaps you sign leads up after a phone call or two. Or maybe it’s a months-long conversation with several people. You won’t need every feature under the sun if you just need a fancy list to keep track of who needs to be called.
  • Who will be using the CRM? Is your team really tech savvy, and comfortable setting up a lot of configuration? Or will they refuse to touch something unless it has a beginner-friendly interface?
  • How many leads do you manage at once? How similar are they? If you’re selling the same thing to every lead, you probably have a fairly straightforward process. A CRM that simply helps you track progress will be fine. But if you have multiple products that have unique sales approaches, you’ll want more flexibility to customize.
  • Where do your sales take place? If you’re out in the field much, then consider CRMs that have mapping features and a strong mobile app (many CRMs don’t).
  • Do you sell via email, phone, or both? Several CRMs that offer in-app calling, call logging, dedicated telephone numbers, and other features that make it easy to manage calls. Other CRMs offer direct integration into email services such as Gmail and Outlook, which is handy if you want to easily track correspondence.
  • How long does this CRM need to last? Remember, just because you pick a CRM now doesn’t mean that you’ll use it until the end of time. Yes, it’s a pain to switch, but if you’re a startup, the software you use today isn’t what you’ll be using three years from now.
  • What other services do you use? Are there email, billing, chat, or other web-based software you use for marketing and sales? Several CRMs offer direct integrations with those platforms, making it a cinch to sync data.
  • How available is your tech team? Many CRMs can’t fully connect to other services unless you make use of their API. Have a custom website that someone wrote from scratch? You’ll need to make API calls if you want those forms on your website to update your CRM automatically. If this is a concern for you, check out Zapier, which offers direct integrations between many platforms, all without writing code.
  • How much does it cost? Don’t worry about this one for now. Most CRMs geared at startups will be within a fairly similar price range. Unless you’re on a shoestring budget, focus on finding a tool that works best for you. More expensive isn’t necessarily better.

Review With Your Team

If you’ve talked through these questions together, you’ll have a pretty good idea of what you need out of a CRM. Here’s what we ended up with:

Our sales process typically involves a couple of emails and a phone call or two. However, the time from initial interest to close can take anywhere from one day to one month. We need something that will make it easy to track correspondence and deal stage. Phone integration and mobile apps are must-haves.

Right now, our products have fixed pricing. The sales process is mostly educational and less focused on negotiation. With that in mind, we didn’t need anything really nuanced. Just an easy way to keep track of how many customers are interested and how many we’ve closed.

Our sales team is a smart bunch, but they don’t have a lot of time to learn a funky interface. Finding something that was intuitive is paramount. While our sales are mostly done in-office, knowing where leads are located geographically is really important, as we sell to many local businesses.

Finally, we need a service that will integrate with MailChimp and Gmail. We’ll also need to update our CRM via an API, since we’d have an custom-built website and sign-up portal for our services.

Go through this exercise and get ready to go hunting…

Narrow It Down

There are a couple options for narrowing choices for finding the right CRM for your startup: use a service such as Capterra or G2 Crowd to filter your options, OR take the easy way by looking at the short list we came up with:

  • Close.io – great for call tracking and a simple interface
  • RelateIQ – uses algorithms to help you know where to spend your time
  • Intercom – offers a single platform for communicating over multiple channels
  • BaseCRM – solid call/email integration, great UI and mobile app
  • HighRise – extremely simple, a glorified contact manager
  • Nimble – strong social media integration
  • Pipedrive – targeted at high-value/low-volume deal flow
  • Pipeline Deals – focused on managing an intricate sales process
  • CapsuleCRM – easy to get started with

Go On A Date

Once you’ve selected three or four candidates, it’s time for a test run. Set up a trial account, import your data, and start to poke around. Before long, you’ll get a sense of how steep the learning curve is and how much customization is involved before you can really make use of it. Make sure you include any mobile apps as part of the trial process.

If you’re still having trouble making a decision on the right CRM for your startup, here are a few tips to help:

  • Submit a support request and see how quickly and thoroughly their team responds.
  • Check out their documentation. How many resources do they provide to help you along?
  • Ask one of their sales reps to tell you why you should choose them over another CRM you’re considering. They may point out some features you weren’t aware of. If you want to dig even deeper, ask the sales rep to tell you what the weak points of their CRM are. Every service has a few.
  • If Salesforce came up on your short list, cross it off. Unless you have a big sales team and a lead who’s already familiar with Salesforce, changes are it will be overkill. By the time you have it set up, you could already have been using a simpler CRM for months.
  • Visit the company’s blog to see how recently they’ve released new features.
  • Take a look at Zapier to see what kinds of integrations are offered. Set up a Zap and see if it works.

Make Your Choice

You won’t know whether you’ve made the perfect decision until you’ve committed to a CRM for your startup, started using it for real deals, and discovered all its warts. But you won’t be able to try them all for months. And at a startup, sometimes done is better than perfect. So make your decision, move forward, and don’t look back.

For us, we went with BaseCRM. We really liked its intuitive interface, call integration, and mobile apps. It also has a fairly good API, which means that it can grow with us for a while. Reporting tools are solid too. Yes, there are some shortcomings we found with it, but none of them are serious enough to cause us to reconsider. And their support team has been really helpful. So far, so good…

Have you gone through the process of picking a new CRM for your startup? If so, I’d love to hear your own thoughts on how to make the process more painless. 


This post was originally published on Flag and Frontier, my marketing consulting business for B2B technology companies.

What Startup Teams Can Learn From 2,000 Years Ago

“Individuals don’t build great companies, teams do,” is a popular saying in the startup community, thanks to Mark Suster. Indeed, of all factors contributing to the success of startup teams – product/market fit, sufficient funding, competitive barriers, and so on – none are relevant without good team dynamics in place.

But how do you know when you have a good team? The challenge with building startup teams is that there are quantitative ways of assessing its health. You know when you need to raise money by looking at your balance sheet. You know that you’re on track for a product/market fit when customers start giving you money. But how do you know that your team has the right composition?

Great Startup Teams Were Forming 2,000 Years Ago

There’s a useful concept that comes from an unlikely source: the Christian church. I promise that this post won’t be about converting you to one religion or another, but keep an open mind. In his book, “Building a Discipling Culture“, author Mike Breen developed a concept called the Fivefold Ministries. The idea stems from the five core roles that are outlined Ephesians 4:11-16 – apostle, prophet, evangelist, pastor, and teacher:

11 Now these are the gifts Christ gave to the church: the apostles, the prophets, the evangelists, and the pastors and teachers. 12 Their responsibility is to equip God’s people to do his work and build up the church, the body of Christ… 16 He makes the whole body fit together perfectly. As each part does its own special work, it helps the other parts grow, so that the whole body is healthy and growing and full of love.

The concept here is pretty straightforward: each person has been given their own set of talents and abilities. Only by “unifying” these talents together can a group of people establish change. In the case of the Ephesians, it meant building a young church in the face of adversity. In the case of a startup, it means creating a new company in the face of risk and competition.

Let’s look closer at these five roles and see how they apply to startups:

Apostles – Leaders Who Break New Ground

Thought leaders and visionaries, apostles are those who break new ground and challenge others’ view of the world. In the New Testament, the Twelve Apostles were those Jesus chose to establish Christianity. Tasked with developing a new religion in the face of very real persecution, the apostles of the early Christian church faced tremendous adversity in their task.

Can you guess what the corollary in startups is? It’s the CEO and early founders: those who attempt to forge a new idea into a viable company. While company founders don’t have to face the risk of death in their pursuits (let’s hope!) their role requires a bold attitude and the ability to keep moving forward in the face of skeptics and competitors. While any startup requires it’s share of apostles, this role isn’t sufficient to get a company off the ground, as we’ll see in a moment.

Elon Musk is a classic example of an Apostle on startup teams.
On track to disrupt at least a couple industries, Elon Musk is a classic Apostle.

Evangelists – The Sales Guys On Startup Teams

Evangelists make it their purpose to tell others about their beliefs and vision. They don’t necessarily set the vision (that’s up to the apostles), but they diffuse it, multiplying the reach of the apostles. Like apostles, though, evangelists also have to face doubters. They must possess the ability to win others over through intellect, empathy, charisma, and persistence.

Evangelists in the early Christian church were responsible for converting others to Christianity. Their counterparts in startup teams are the salesmen, corporate developers, and startup marketers, who “convert” new relationships into partners, customers, and investors.

Startup teams can learn a great deal from Guy Kawasaki's evangelism.
One of the early tech evangelists, Guy Kawasaki.

Prophets – Product Managers Who See The Future

This may seem like a stretch for startups, but not when you look deeper at the meaning of the word. It’s Greek root prophetes simply means “inspired preacher or teacher”.  In the Biblical context, prophets were inspired by God and cast a vision of what they believed would happen in the future. Relying on perception, intuition, and feeling, prophets are not unlike artists, who challenge our view of the world with their artwork.

In the startup sense, prophets can take the form of consultants and advisors, often in the form of futurists. These visionaries look at how industry, technology, culture, politics, and other macro forces are interacting, and they predict what the world will look like in the coming years. While not as focused on implementation as other roles, prophets play an important part in helping startups challenge existing ways of thinking.

Pastors – Managers Who Help Startup Teams Improve

Pastors are simply those who care for others. They guard, protect, and nurture those in their custody. In the early Christian church, pastors were responsible for caring for young Christian communities that needed steady guidance and encouragement.

In startup teams, the needs are not much different. Faced with uncertainty about the future and lacking the cohesiveness that comes from working with others for a long period of time, startup teams need to be nurtured. A startup “pastor” may take the form of a special employee who has the rare talent of bonding people together, or in a more formal role, such as a human resources lead. In any role, pastors are crucial to developing and reinforcing a healthy company culture.

Most startup teams would love to have the culture that Tony Hsieh built.
One of today’s leaders in developing a great company culture, Tony Hsieh.

Teachers – Helping Make Startup Teams Smarter

Anyone who has a desire to know the truth and impart it to others can considered a teacher. Early Christians needed teachers to explain how Jesus’s teachings. While we tend to think of teachers today as those formally employed as such, teachers in startup teams can take many forms.

It’s an engineer who helps his team understand a new technology. The manager who makes sure his team understands the priorities of the company. The analyst who looks closely at product metrics and provides ideas for improvement. And it’s the designer who helps his startup team adopt a common visual language in its products.

What Does Your Startup Team Need?

As you’ve read this post, you’ve probably thought of a few people on your team who fit into these roles. Take a few minutes and review everyone who’s a part of your startup. Do you have strong players in each? Is everyone in a role that’s suited to their talents? What areas is your team lacking in talent?

Now consider what a team with solid players in each role would look like. You’d have a rich blend of people who can lead the formation of the company and set its vision (apostles), gain customers and advocates (evangelists), understand the future of your industry and your company’s role in it (prophets), keep employees empowered and happy (pastors), and ensure that the team is working on the right things and has the knowledge to execute (teachers). A pretty strong crew indeed.


This post was originally published on Flag and Frontier, my marketing consulting business for B2B technology companies.

Your New Startup Job: Are You a Savior or an FNG?

If you find yourself at a new startup job, you might ask yourself, “well, what do I do here?” Job roles at a startup company change day to day, which means that your definition of success might be different from what you’d use at a traditional company. To get your answer, consider two opposite approaches to defining your startup job the FNG and the Savior.

Why You Never Want To Be An FNG

FNG stands for “F**king New Guy”. It’s the guy who just shows up clueless, doesn’t know the culture, lacks any sort of useful knowledge (or the wherewithal to share it), and generally gets in the wayYou never really like this guy because he doesn’t know why he’s there, and neither do you. He stands around and just does what he’s told, and it’s exactly who Charlie Sheen’s character, Chris, became in the 1986 classic film, Platoon:

The Opposite Of An FNG: The Savior

On the other end of the spectrum lies The Savior, the genius whose transformative insight or wisdom forever changes the way his company works. It’s the person every company aspires to hire. Unfortunately, finding a Savior is about as easy is spotting a unicorn. In the movie Moneyball, the Oakland A’s get lucky and identify one in Jonah Hill’s character, Peter. By looking at the struggling baseball team’s player selection process in an entirely new way, Peter completely reworks the way the team recruits and helps turn the organization around:

Avoiding The FNG Role Is A Choice

Obviously, no one envies Chris and few wouldn’t love to be as insightful as Peter, but what really separates the two? Here are three factors:

Attitude

Peter started exploring new ways of selecting players long before he had any real influence on the A’s. He wasn’t hired to be “influential”, but he didn’t wait for his boss to prompt him before innovating. He just did it. The fact that Peter was at his first job and in a relatively junior position didn’t stop him. It shouldn’t stop you, either. Just because you’re new and/or junior doesn’t mean you can’t start asking lots of questions and figuring out where you can add value. If you’re waiting around for someone to tell you how you can help, you probably won’t be around for long.

Perspective

Your naivety in a new industry or at a new company may be your greatest strength. In fact, it’s not at  uncommon for outsiders to use their unique perspective to help companies do new things. Witness Steve Jobs’ disruption of the music and mobile phone industries. Or the exploits of Sir Richard Branson, who said, “My interest in life comes from setting myself huge, apparently unachievable challenges and trying to rise above them… “. Or Alan Mulally, who brought Ford back to profitability despite having no automotive experience. You may not be a captain of industry, but if treat your “new guy” perspective as an asset, you’ll go far.

Environment

Sometimes, the culture of a startup can have a big influence on the effectiveness of new hires . The Vietnam military culture that Chris faced in Platoon certainly didn’t foster the development of new recruits. Fresh soldiers were all but guaranteed to be FNGs. Ask yourself: does the company you’re planning to join encourage new ideas and different ways of thinking? Have they asked for your perspective on problems they’re currently tackling? Do the people you interview with ask for your critiques on how the company can improve?

If the answer to any of these is no, then don’t work there. Chances are, your new ideas won’t go very far. Find a company who values your input, even if your ideas aren’t as helpful at first.

Startups are quick to hire, and quick to fire, so hopefully this post moves you a bit less of an FNG and slightly more of a Savior. Good luck!

Jeep and Five Other Brands That Bring People Together

Why are there some brands that bring people together, while others have no sense of community? Let’s me share a story from high school to point out why.

As a high school senior, I used to wave at strangers all the time. No, not because I was awkward at meeting girls (OK, maybe I was), but because they (and I) happened to be driving the same particular brand of car. Can you guess it? Here’s a hint: “It’s a ____ thing, you wouldn’t understand“, reads a common decal that its owners like to place on their windshields.

That’s right… Jeep. Let me explain. Jeep owners love their Jeeps. Even more, they love talking to other Jeep owners. Why is why there’s an unpublished rule that when you’re driving a Jeep and you see another Jeep, you wave. And if you’re stopped next to another Jeep at a stop light, you might say something profound to the other driver, like “Hey, nice Jeep!”. At which point, the other driving will reply with something equally thought-provoking, like “You too, bro!”

Owning a Jeep means being part of something special, a community of owners who share similar passions. There are even Jeep Jamborees all over the country for those who want to pay money to drag their cars over rocks and meet other people doing the same thing.

Brands That Bring People Together Have A Competitive Advantage

The strong owner community is one of that Willys/Kaiser-Jeep/Chrysler (and now Fiat) has been able to produce and sell essentially the same vehicle for almost 70 years, with the open-top CJ that became available for consumers in the 1940s that turned into the modern Wrangler.

But look – when you by a Ford Explorer, you become a car owner. When you buy a Jeep, you become part of a club. For many, that’s reason enough to choose the Jeep brand over another. Jeep is one one the few car brands that bring people together, and I consider this a competitive advantage for them. It’s just not something most car manufacturers can claim they have. 

Unfortunately, strong customer communities are rare for brands, but here are five other outstanding brands that bring people together:

Airstream

I didn’t know that Airstreams were a thing until my relatives bought one. But going on “rallies” with other Airstream owners is a big event, and another reason to buy an Airstream over a less expensive brand. The largest Airstream club Wally Byam Caravan Club International, has over 14,000 members.

Minecraft

While many “social games” have strong communities of players, Minecraft is one of the few where you actually play with other people, simultaneously. In case you’ve never played, the game is basically Legos meets World of Warcraft. Its players have built some amazing things together, like this stunning recreation of Game of Thrones. And I thought I spent too much time on video games!

Minecraft is one the best examples of brands that bring people together online.

Harley Davidson

Does this really need an explanation? A Harley does the exact same thing as a Honda Goldwing, but you don’t exactly see droves of Goldwing owners banded together on a highway. Buying a Harley is the price of entry for joining any variety of riding clubs, whether it’s one made up suburbanites, Chinese, or full-blown outlaws. Harley Davidson always delivers on its brand promise of making riders feel unique while being part of a special community.

Harley is one of the brands that bring people together across the globe.

CrossFit

Go to your run-of-the-mill gym, and chances are you barely talk to a soul while you’re there. If you do, it’s probably the buddy you brought with you. But join a CrossFit, and if you haven’t met at least a few people after a couple classes, you’re doing it wrong. The group orientation of the classes and the high  intensity they encourage really fosters a sense of camaraderie. And that’s a big part of what keeps members coming back.

CrossFit is one of the brands that brings people together in all sorts of communities.

Linux

A computer operating system built on the “free and open source” model, Linux has seen over 8,000 developers contribute to its code base since it was released in 1991. You may not run it on your machine, but more than 95% of the world’s 500 fastest supercomputers run some variant of Linux. It’s a great example of brands that bring people together both virtually and in person. Many cities host Linux User Groups to allow software engineers to learn from each other and share their appreciation for the operating system.

Know of any other brands that thrive on their strong customer communities? Let me know in the comments.

The Delta Marketing Department Is Better Than Yours

If you haven’t seen the latest pre-flight safety video that the Delta marketing department created, it’s a riot. It’s the latest in a string of comical takes on the standard (and usually mind-numblingly boring) safety films that anyone who’s flown in the past decade is already familiar with:

OK, so I’m sure you laughed a little bit. But I wanted to break down why this video is such a win from a marketing perspective. Making a funny video is one thing. But making an otherwise dry by necessary production into something that people actually seek out to watch is another feat entirely. Let’s take a closer look:

Humor Increases Engagement

Delta (and presumably the FAA) really do want you to watch their video. The information it conveys could literally save your life. Making the video humorous ultimately serves to get passengers watching, which is a good thing. This is probably the most important lesson for anyone involved in technical writing or user experience: just because your subject is serious doesn’t mean that the message has to be. Of course, the Germans learned this decades ago: here’s the classic example.

Comedy Doesn’t Distract From The Message

This is actually hard to do. But most of the humorous bits relate directly to the message conveyed at that time. For example, when passengers are told to ask flight attendants if they have any questions, they see a business man looking for help with his Rubik’s Cube. And it’s hard to ignore how to deal with oxygen masks, because seeing Arf don his own mask is pretty unforgettable.

I've never solved one either.
I’ve never solved one either.

No Inside Jokes, But The Humor Is Especially Relevant To The Core Audience

Even if you didn’t grow up in the 80’s, watching the hair metal guitar player store his “ax” in the overhead compartment is going to make you laugh no matter what. So is the guy in the multi-colored track suit dancing the robot as he takes his seat in the exit row.

Even though the video will be funny to most watchers, it connects especially with what’s likely to be the the core audience for Delta marketing department: 30-60 year olds. It starts with watching the straight-laced business man place his Devo energy dome underneath the seat in front of him. References to mullets, Teddy Ruxpin, Gameboy, Atari, croquet, and Tab ensue. And the piece de resistance: seeing Kareem Abdul-Jabbar reprise his role in the classic movie Airplane, as Roger Murdock, the co-pilot.

"I'm sorry son, but you must have me confused with someone else. My name is Roger Murdock. I'm the co-pilot."
“I’m sorry son, but you must have me confused with someone else. My name is Roger Murdock. I’m the co-pilot.”

They Didn’t Overthink It

There are certainly some temporal challenges with the video. Passengers seem to have been transported from 30 years ago to the present. Not only are they seated in a modern 737, but they’re told not to use Wi-Fi, which didn’t exist then. Delta could have stopped halfway through the script to realize “Um… this doesn’t actually make logical sense…”, but they pressed on.

Respect For The Passengers

Perhaps Delta considered yelling (in a thick German accent): “NOW YOO MUST VATCH ZEE SAFETY WIDEO!” But they thought better of that and actually decided to make the passengers’ day slightly better by making them laugh. They even give a nod to those who’ve flown with Delta for a little while: the red-headed girl at wagging her finger is supposed to be the original Delta redhead in their first lighthearted production several years ago.

"Smoking is NOT ALLOWED, on any Delta flight..."
“Smoking is NOT ALLOWED, on any Delta flight…”

The Delta Marketing Department Knows How to Connect With Its Audience

This is marketing done right. The Delta marketing department has effectively used humor to make its messaging more effective and to improve its customers’ view of the brand. Now can every other company who thinks it’s too boring to be interesting please take note?!?

What To Work On At The Airport? Here’s How To Decide

Some days at work you’re a productivity powerhouse. You’re cranking through projects, e-mails, to-dos like Paul Bunyan at a Christmas tree farm in December. Maybe you didn’t even check Facebook even once. You’re in the zone. But trying to figure out what to work on at the airport is usually a study in the opposite. Your ability to focus is right up there with your ability to sweet talk that car rental agent into giving you a Camaro even though you paid for a Kia.

Switching Environments Makes It Impossible To Decide What To Work On At The Airport

Why does this happen? When traveling, you’re constantly switching environments, and have only a vague idea of how much time you’ll be spending in each. Finding out what to work on at the airport is a project in of itself. Does this look familiar?

Office -> Car -> Security -> Airport Gate 1 -> Airplane 1 -> Airport Gate 2 -> Airplane 2 -> Airport 3 -> Taxi Stand -> Taxi -> Hotel, etc., etc.,

In a typical trip, you might switch environments nearly a dozen times. Not including the smaller changes, like having to turn your laptop off during takeoff, or stopping to pay for some healthy food a bag of Tropical Starburst.

For some reason I believe that no one felt this way when traveling in say, the 1980s, when people still smoked during flights, and didn’t even know to ask “should I use Prodigy or CompuServe?” But today, it’s ultra easy to get stuck in a “technology loop” while fleeting across the country. All you need is a iPhone, or perhaps a laptop with a just poor wi-fi connection at the airport (especially if the wi-fi connection is poor).

The Environment Is Rife With Distractions

Armed with the latest gadgets and 14 productivity apps, you think, “There’s no reason why my work pattern should be any different today, even though a baby is crying next to me and the man sitting next to me just had to take his call on speakerphone.”  Which is both false and impossible. But here’s what happens anyway:

10:07 – Check mail on phone. See 37 unread messages. Delete one that looks like spam. So productive!

10:09 – Start to read a thread that looks  important. Fail as the full message content refuses to load. Stare at the screen for 30 seconds while your phone makes up its mind about whether it has an internet connection or not.

10:11 – Let phone do it’s thing while you try the airport wifi on your laptop.

10:15 – Finally get your computer to connect to the “free” Boingo wireless hotspot. Wonder what their ridiculous looking guy with the grey suit and red bag is running from.

10:17 – Load the same 37 unread messages on your laptop. Including the same spam message you thought you just deleted on your phone.

10:20 – Read that email thread you thought needed attention.

10:21 – Start to write a thoughtful response.

10:22 – Hear on the PA, “Ladies and gentleman, we are now boarding Zone 1…”

10:23 – Cry inside

There, you just spent 16 of your life in a very busy but utterly unfruitful attempt to Get Something Done. Your plans to optimize what to work on at the airport, lasted about five minutes. And you’ve actually made yourself worse off, because you’ve depleted a good deal of mental energy reserves hassling with everything.

Don’t Try To Force The Office Routine When You’re Out Of The Office

This happened to you not because you’re not being productive enough, or because your using the wrong tools, or because AT&T’s coverage sucks (which, it does). It happened because you fell into the trap of trying to replicate your office workflow while in a very different context. You’re like the person that tech companies like to feature in their commercials, who believe that we all want the ability to check email while climbing a mountain.

Ask This Once Question To Decide What To Work On At The Airport

So how do you actually decide what to work on at the airport? The idea isn’t to ignore your work, not to travel, or use this as an excuse to buy the latest phone. Instead, ask yourself this one question every time you face a disruptive environment:

What can I do right now that I can perform at 100% effectiveness?

The answer is usually not the thing you’re attempting to do at the time. Writing email while waiting to board the plane? You’re maybe 25% as effective. Working on your marketing strategy while in the back of a taxi? I’ll give you 15%. Working on that presentation when you have 10 minutes left to use your laptop? You’ll barely get warmed up before you have to stop.

Instead of trying to do what you would normally be doing at 10:17 in the morning, flip your approach around and find the thing that you can do the absolute best, right now.

The answers will vary from person to person. For me, I can listen an audiobook at full attention in nearly any environment (Audible is my friend). I can actually do spreadsheets quite well on a plane. And taxis are a great place for me to make phone calls. Airport security line? Still working on that one.

Try keeping this question in mind next time you are trying to figure out what to work on at the airport. You may not get as much pure office work done during  travel, but you’ll end the day with greater mental energy and an increased ability to focus on the more challenging things. Like writing a blog post.

Got any more thoughts on how to make the best of a travel day? I’d love to hear them.

Why Isn’t Non-Profit Failure Allowed?

For-profit businesses publicly fail all the time. When they do, it’s not the end of the world – learning from one’s mistakes (and those of others) can be an enormous factor in long-term success. In the non-profit world, though, failures are often swept under the rug. But since charities could especially benefit from learning through failure, why isn’t non-profit failure more widely accepted?

A new service called Admitting Failure wants to change that. In this post, we’ll look at what the business world is able to learn from failure, and examine what Admitting Failure is doing to help the non-profit world achieve the same thing.

Failure Is Natural In Business

When Apple came out with the $700 Newton PDA in 1993, it didn’t exactly vault the company to success. In fact, it was one of the company’s most ridiculed products. And when Pepsi launched a massive marketing campaign to convince us to drink Crystal Pepsi, the clear cola didn’t live long. But even successful companies prepare to fail from time to time. What makes failure such a natural part of the business world?

Reward for taking risk. Trying something new is often what allows companies to achieve breakthrough success, and that requires risk and the occasional failure. Sometimes “playing it safe” by not taking any risks is a sure way to slowly kill a company.

Investors tolerate failure. A good investor diversifies his portfolio, knowing that some companies will yield negative returns. It’s an expected outcome that factors into any good investor’s calculations.

Failures are made public. Talk show hosts and business blogs alike love to poke fun at “game changing” products that no one bought. Business schools thrive on doing case studies on corporate mistakes. Since everyone is exposed to failures in business, they’re not always a surprise. And even better, there’s a wealth of information out there for anyone who wants to learn from the past.

Charity Executives Have To Avoid Non-Profit Failure

If the world’s most successful companies fail from time to time, it goes without saying the even the world’s best non-profits are going to make mistakes too. But unfortunately, non-profits aren’t allowed to fail publicly the way businesses are. For one, there isn’t a massive reward for taking massive risk, so non-profits aren’t as encouraged to experiment.

Secondly, donors aren’t yet comfortable with their dollars being used for experiments, which means non-profits are less likely to try unproven ideas. And there’s no forum for failures to be widely publicized, so logistically, sharing failures in the non-profit community would be hard to pull off anyway.

Can Admitting Failure Change The Status Quo?

Admitting Failure addresses the problem of “private failures” in the non-profit community primarily by addressing the logistical issue – no common forum for non-profit failures to be disclosed and discussed. The platform is a good start; take a look at this post from charity: water about the failure of one of their metrics:

…you have probably heard us say, Tweet or write: $20 can provide clean and safe drinking water to one person for 20 years. But earlier this year, we removed the “20 years” part from that messaging.

As with any retraction, this sparked a discussion with our staff about how we deal with failure… we knew that if we continued to promise that each $20 donation would provide one person access to water for two decades, we’d be using a number we’re not certain about. In effect, we’d be failing the faith of the public and our mission to “reinvent charity”—to restore peoples’ trust in charitable work…

In a way, showing the public where we’ve messed up or why we want to suddenly move in a new direction is like taking a deep sigh of relief. We’ve given ourselves the chance to share the hard stuff. We’re sparking important conversations and welcoming scrutiny because we really have nothing to hide.

Donors Need To Think Like Investors

charity: water deserves praise for taking the lead on admitting their own mistakes. But public acceptance of non-profit failure won’t happen until donors begin to act differently. In  business, executives try to disclose failure more readily because investors demand it, especially in the startup space.

So while example like charity:water are fine, non-profit failure won’t be widely disclosed until donors begin taking the approach of an investor. Donors need to encourage the non-profits they support to experiment, make mistakes, and share their learnings. They need to diversify their donations, to improve the odds of them supporting a truly successful project. And most of all, they need to let non-profits know that it’s OK to fail once in a while. Here are three ways Admitting Failure could help them do this:

  1. Give donors tools to encourage their favorite non-profits to participate on the site. They could even take a page from Invisible Children‘s playbook and give users a one-click method to target high-profile non-profits on Twitter.
  2. Rate charities, in the fashion of Charity Navigator, based on the knowledge they’ve contributed to the non-profit community. Messaged correctly, charities who developed a reputation for being honest could benefit from additional donor support.
  3. Allow aid recipients themselves to share their perspective on a non-profit’s work. No one has a more authentic experience than the person who was targeted by an aid program. This would be a great way to build a 360-degree perspective of a non-profit.

What do you think – would executives discuss non-profit failure more readily, if only given the right tools? Or do donors need to become more involved before any real change can take place?