How to Build a Social Media Content Plan with Trello

Here’s a dead-simple way to plan content with Trello.

Caveat: this post will not teach you how to be a social media “ninja”, “guru”, or “rockstar”. If you aspire to use one of those terms to describe yourself, or already do, seek professional help. Or just quit the internet.

Ok. On to the post…

Managing your company’s social media presence can be a mess if you’re not intentional about it. It’s like that guy who’s sat on the couch all year and decides that on January 1, he’s going to go to the gym “like all the time.” Week one, he’s there every day. Week two… well, you know what happens. Without a solid plan that you can stick to, your social media content won’t be consistent or effective.

That’s why I’m going to show you how to plan a full month’s worth of content in 30 minutes or less.

For the sake of simplicity, this post will focus just on Facebook. However, the methodology can be used for any content calendar, and even for multiple social networks if you’re creative. Here’s how it works:

1. Ask yourself what you want to accomplish. Why do you even have a social media presence in the first place? Do you want to keep customers talking about your brand? Announce new products? Set the tone for your brand’s voice? Make a list of key objectives. Keep it short, not more than three or four. Just like the guy planning to hit Gold’s Gym every day, not knowing why you’re doing something is a sure path to quitting. Here’s an example:

  • Keep customers informed of new product features
  • Foster engagement by highlighting outstanding customers
  • Reinforce our values through human-interest and humorous content
  • Improve company image vignettes of employees

2. Identify the type of content that will best serve each of those objectives. Example:

  • Keep customers informed… via events announcements and company news (Update)
  • Foster engagement… by highlighting outstanding customers (Community)
  • Reinforce our values… through human-interest and humorous content (Voice)
  • Improve company image… by featuring profiles of employees (Personality)

3. Prioritize your categories. Don’t just say, “they’re all important!”; prioritizing will help you decide how much content is devoted to each. Try this: give yourself 10 “points” to hand out. Give more points to the most important objectives, and fewer to secondary ones. So much math!!

  • Update: 3
  • Community: 3
  • Voice: 2
  • Image: 2

4. Calculate your output capacity. How many posts per month can you consistently commit to? Don’t bite off more than you can chew and burn out after a month. At our company, we are planning to ramp up our volume to about 20 posts a month. That’s on the aggressive side, but we generate a lot of growth through Facebook and our followers have been very engaged with our content. Having videos with lots of gratuitous explosions always helps.

5. Do some math. With you ideal volume in hand, it’s time to match that against the priorities you outlined earlier. Apply the formula below to

Number of posts/month = (points assigned to category / total points) x total posts/month

For our first category, Updates, the formula would look like this:

(3 points / 10 total points) x 20 posts/month = 6 Update posts per month

Easy! You didn’t even need a calculator. Right? Right????…..  Don’t worry I won’t tell your 4th grade math teacher. Just repeat for the remaining categories and you’ll have a baseline plan for how many posts of each type to publish each month. Here’s what you’d end up with for all four categories:

  • Update – 6 posts/month
  • Community – 6 posts/month
  • Voice – 4 posts/month
  • Personality – 4 posts/month

6. Take things over to Trello. We use a 4-step workflow to manage content throughout the month. Every piece of content starts out in a Planned list, and moves through the following steps:

  1. Planned
  2. Being worked on
  3. Pending approval
  4. Scheduled

You may need fewer or more depending on the structure of your team. We have multiple content contributors, but only a couple content approvers, so this process helps us hand off content to the right people.

Now… create a Trello card in the Planned for each post you outlined above. The result will look something like this. Look at all those beautiful posts just waiting to be written. So many Likes and Shares lie ahead:

A fresh month...

7. Assign owners. Whether you have one person or a team of ten managing content, make sure that every single card has an owner. This is the person who will make sure that a piece of content is drafted, edited, and published on time, and by the right people. Give your team the gift of clear ownership and it will greatly streamline your process. Don’t assign owners and watch you best intentions disintegrate into pure and unrelenting madness. Your Facebook fans deserver better, don’t they?

8. Set due dates. With you content list established, it’s time to figure out what to post when. Trello gives you a great calendar view, which makes it super-simple to get a bird’s eye view of the month. We use also labels to designate content categories, making it  easy to see what type of content will go out when. Here’s a possible result that will satisfy any obsessive compulsive disorder sufferer, with it’s neatly-spaced scheduling.

Get writing!

9. Get writing. You have all your work cut out for you for the month. No more planning, go write!

At the end of the month, sit down with your content team and examine the results. Which types of posts performed the best? Were there days of the week when you saw better results? Was your team able to handle the load?

You’ll want to make some tweaks to make next month even more effective. Now you’ve established a baseline, though, your process will be much more effective and well-informed.

Bonus round: You can download a free content planning template in Trello here. Enjoy!

Does Facebook’s $19B purchase of WhatsApp make sense?

Most of me wants to say no. Only for two reasons.

One, WhatsApp would be in kindergarten if it was a child, and its entire staff could fit on a Greyhound bus. Seeing them valued at the same market cap as a company like Sony makes my brain hurt. Oh, and they make about as much revenue as a bag boy does at the local Kroger.

Two, I’m jealous. I’ll admit it. How can I not be? A valuation of around $500-million per employee is any startup’s dream. If our company hit 1/10 that valuation I’d have a grin glued to my face. Fortunately, I’d make enough so that I could afford surgery to restore my face to normal.

But after I thought it, I don’t think Zuckerberg is insane. While there’s no revenue model in the world that can justify that price for a service that barely brings in revenue (and certainly isn’t profitable), I think that Facebook was more likely to be asking themselves, “How much is it worth to keep someone else from buying WhatsApp?”.

Yes, Facebook is the world’s largest social network and is already a bit more Orwellian than most of us would like. But it’s no longer the place to be, especially among teens. Facebook even admits that:

Just a year ago, 42% of teens surveyed told pollsters they preferred Facebook to all other services; by spring, that had fallen to 33%, and now stands at 23%.

In other words, Facebook can’t assume that younger people will continue to see its service as the de facto place to share selfies. Teens have Instagram (which Facebook bought), SnapChat (which they tried to buy), and WhatsApp (bought). And let’s not forget Twitter, WeChat, Line, and Viber (each with at least 200 million users) competing for market share. With over 450 million users on WhatsApp, Facebook would take on a huge penalty should it fall into the hands of a Google or a Yahoo!.

Facebook itself only took a handful of years to go from dorm room project to international behemoth; what’s to keep another social network from displacing it in short order? That full discussion is probably worthy of a separate blog post, but the short answer is not much. At this point, Facebook has to be just as defensive (by keeping other large networks from coming under the control of a competitor) as it is offensive (by continuing to pursue both user and revenue growth).

Is $19 billion the right amount to pay for that defense? We’ll never know for sure, but if it keeps Facebook relevant with teens and holds off a challenging social network from displacing it for a few more years, the answer is yes.